Articles: Teaching %

May 15, 2015

When you have anti-English, pro-European nationalists in Scotland and anti-European, pro-British nationalists in England, spiced up with a few anti-English, pro-European nationalists in Wales and of course, the anti-each-other, pro-whatever your having yourself, British and Irish nationalists in that blissfully incoherent chunk of Ulster – Northern Ireland, you know you’re not in the old UK. More

May 1, 2014

October 23, 2013

Will a European Tea Party emerge? The Financial Times this week believes so. What do you think? 2014 is a big year for Europe with parliamentary elections in June. The economies are still very weak, but financial markets are roaring ahead and Brussels is in triumphant mood. Can this continue? Here’s our take. We’d like to hear yours. More

October 4, 2013

Hi just back from a three week lecture of the US, due to unforeseen circumstances, I have to postpone the new Economics without Boundaries course which was to start on Monday 7 October. More

February 24, 2013

To paraphrase JP Morgan, sometimes nothing undermines your financial judgement so much as an eejit with an economics degree. More

February 16, 2013

My latest Punk Economics video takes some altitude and looks at the global food economy: where it is now, how we got here – and what we might see in the future. This is vital stuff for all of us – take a look and let me know what you think! More

February 12, 2013

July 9, 2012

A few thoughts on the state of the global economy: China Panics, US ‘Recovers’ and Germany Flinches. More

May 18, 2012

Punk Economics is a new way looking at the economy based on the central idea that what is important is not complicated and what is complicated is never important. More

March 30, 2012


When I was still in primary school, punk rock emerged – it seemed to me – out of nowhere and re-invented music. Before, music to me was an overblown, self-indulgent, long-winded prog-rock concept album about prisms and rainbows. Even as a youngfella, my vision of hell was being locked in a room with Genesis albums on a never-ending loop (it still is). Punk blew that world apart and changed the way we listened to music, the way it looked, sounded – and what it meant.

Economics and economic analysis has become similarly overblown and self-indulgent. Worse still, many (not all) economists have failed to make it simple, easy and comprehensible for the vast majority of people, something economics must be, if it’s to be of any use to us.

Punk Economics tries to do with economics what punk rock did with music – change the way it looks, feels and sounds using animation. Cartoons help us break things down – they’ve helped me since I was a child.

I am blessed to work with the brilliant artist Mark Flood on these videos and I hope that they make the economic world a bit easier to get your head around. I suppose it’s a public service, but I love doing it. One day I might even figure out how to get paid, but for now let’s plough on.